My Mitten Across the Pond

I realize I’m a bit late in addressing the Royal Wedding, but I have a good excuse:

We really couldn’t have cared less about it.

What could our little Michigan wedding have in common with Kate and William's? Besides the paparazzi being highly interested in both (obviously)?

In fact, the more people commented to me about the pair’s nuptials as if I should be especially interested in them, the less interested I became. Yes, Mike and I are the same age as William and Kate. We are also getting married. To my knowledge, however, no tourist shops are offering tins of celebratory biscuits with our faces on them. Seven thousand journalists are about as likely to turn up to our wedding as we are likely to spend $50 million on it.

This was the sort of event, however, that was difficult to avoid. Though we do not have television in our loft and I wasn’t even listening to the radio on Friday, I was still inexplicably inundated with facts and photos of the big day. And, totally against my own will, I began to to see exactly why I should care about the Royal Wedding. The reason this event was so meaningful to everyone in Great Britain was because this was a pure, joyful celebration of all things British. Sort of like our goal of having a celebration of all things Michigan.

Now, just as I don’t expect anyone from Alabama to care about our wedding, I’m still unsure why anyone outside of Great Britain who wasn’t planning a wedding with a similar theme cared about the Royal Wedding, but I officially have a reason to concern myself with it now. So I looked. And looked. And ogled, and wowed. It turns out when there are 7,000 journalists covering your wedding, there is a lot of evidence of it on the Internet. I’m sure I only scratched the surface, but here are a few things I found from William and Kate’s wedding that I found delightful, notable and/or relevant to our planning:

  • British music. According to the Huffington Post, an English singer-songwriter was the musical entertainment at the reception, and William and Kate danced their first dance to an Elton John cover. Why they needed a cover when Elton

    While we don't expect any Michigan music legends to actually attend our wedding, we certainly intend to pay tribute to Michigan music. Or, if Elton show up, we'll let him play a song or two.

    was actually in attendance, I don’t know. But the care they took to show off their nation’s talent was noted.

  • They had 300 guests at their official reception. We’re planning for 300 guests. Um…maybe we’re planning too big of a wedding?
  •  British food. Their menu included, “Aberdeen Angus beef fillet, Welsh lamb from the Highgrove estate, spring vegetables grilled and blanched and a trio of chocolate puddings.” Fortunately, Michigan food actually tastes good, so we’re ahead of them on that one.
  • I was not a huge fan of Kate’s dress, but that’s just because it wasn’t my style. I do like that she specified her desire to blend tradition – something I imagine it’s difficult to get away from in the biggest royal wedding in 30 years – with her own sleek, modern style. Part of our desire to include Michigan as a central theme of our wedding is because it is a part of our own heritage and tradition. Just like Kate’s dress, we hope that our entire day becomes a blend of our family traditions and our forward-thinking points of view so that it becomes a perfect for us.
  • This is William and Kate driving away from the wedding, looking like two happy, normal people in love, having fun on their wedding day. We’ll take some of that too.

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7 Responses to My Mitten Across the Pond

  1. Nick says:

    This was such a precious post…I myself was not “into” the Royal Wedding, yet I had so many friends who were, and wouldn’t stop talking about it. But… after reading this post I feel so open to so many other ideas Natalie!!!!! You have opened my eyes to the possibility that I might actually like something I thought I would hate so much…and if you can apply that to the idea of a wedding, think of how the world could so easily change. 🙂 I feel like your wedding and this blog are applicable to SO many other things in life!

  2. Suzy says:

    I was sad to see that you didn’t promise that you would also be encouraging the sporting of very large hats. I was hoping to make one for L.

    On a serious note, you are a delight and I enjoyed this reflection on the wedding.

    • natalieburg says:

      Oh, I assumed no encouragement would be necessary for Lils to show up in a ginormous hat. What do you suppose the result of telling people to wear Michigan hats would be? Red, plaid hunting caps with ear flaps? Camo baseball hats?

      I shudder to think.

      • suzy says:

        Of course they would be Stormy Cromers!! of blaze orange hunting hats with a felt deer on them.

        Lil, of course, would be sporting something in the shape of the Mackinaw Bridge.

  3. Rebecca says:

    Nat, so funny because I actually thought of you as I was watching “The Making of the Royal Wedding” – it was so fascinating to see all the things that were being made to show off British handicrafts. I imagine industrious artisans across Michigan burning the midnight oil to hand-stitch your wedding garments, weave heritage Michigan lace, and handpaint and fire your official Michigan crest onto Michigan porcelain….

    Did you hear that Kate’s “express wish” was that all the greenery and flowers should be in season, English flowers? (Also, I think you should start working that phrase into your wedding planning vocabulary!)

  4. Alisa says:

    Ha! Love the comment about the food. We recently watched an Anthony Bourdain episode where he goes to England and it caused me permanent damage. I hope this isn’t offensive to your British readership, I’m sure there are many delightful British dishes that were not featured on that episode. Maybe I should recover by watching the episode where comes to Ann Arbor…

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